European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 5)

Dungarvan

It is one harbor town midway along the southern coast of Ireland, Dungarvan has worked to retain plenty of its traditional charm. This town is indeed divided into two by the estuary of Colligan River, with the town’s main sights found on the river’s west side. These have the Waterford County Museum as well as, as with a lot of Irish towns, the castle. Dungarvan Castle is known for overlooking the harbor, which is primarily populated by small fishing and sailing boats nowadays. Plus, there is an old Augustinian friary’s remnant, around which has been sited one more modern Catholic Church.

Kilkenny

South Park fans can be forgiven as they think this comes with a different meaning; still, Kilkenny is among the most popular tourist destinations of Ireland. Easily accessible on a day journey from Dublin, the medieval town features many ancient buildings with excellent preservation. For example, Kilkenny Castle is situated on the Nore River’s banks and with ample grounds. There are other notable buildings, say, Rothe House – it is the house of one 16th century merchant, and St. Canice’s Cathedral. This place is more than only one historic honeypot, though; in the Kilkenny Arts Festival, Irish and international creativity is displayed over ten days each August.

Kenmare

Located at Kenmare Bay’s head, which opens out into the Atlantic Ocean, this town is charming. It first gained some semblance of worldly prominence through the lace-working industry. Here, the distinction in needlepoint lace technique was started by Saint Clare’s Convent’s nuns, although it has since closed. Yet, the Lace and Design Centre of Kenmare is open to the public. Not all, Kenmare has the Bronze Age stone circle close to the center of the town. The main center is quite small, but there are excellent hotels and restaurants here.