European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 3)

Carlingford

Why do not you stand on Carlingford’s shore as well as looking across the lough? That way, you will be able to admire Northern Ireland. Plenty of history connected to the Irish Sea’s other side can probably be found in Carlingford’s medieval streets. A toll gate and mint tend to be overshadowed by the remarkable King John Castle which was built by the Normans around 1210 after these ones first invaded Ireland from 1173. The strategic location of the town has ever been the source of success. Yet divisions aside, this town is full of historic remnants and travelers can find some great seafood here as well.

Cobh


It is a significant seaport for many transatlantic ships. It was also Europe’s last stopping point before the Titanic started its fateful maiden voyage. This town is quirky and quaint. You will see cottages that are cutely painted step down to the fantastic waterfront beside St. Colman’s Cathedral’s prominent spire. A memorial is present by the edge of the water to the Lusitania – it is another impressive ship that succumbed to the deeps when getting sunk by a U-boat of the  German close by. Cobh was one of the crucial ports in several most significant mass migrations in the 19th century. Be sure you consider visiting this place.

Clifden

County Galway is famous as one of the most beautiful Irish counties, and the verdant, wooded surrounds of Clifden do nothing to minimize that claim. Beginning life quite late, earlier in the 19th century, it came into being as a result of Clifden Castle close by. This town was linked by the road to Galway as well as beyond. The estate did fail and fall into disrepair, but this great town continued modest growth and is considered Connemara’s unofficial capital these days.