European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 6)

Killarney

It is easily among the prettiest as well as the most charming places in Ireland. It is one characterful attraction with its longstanding importance as one religious site from the seventh century. Yet, Killarney National Park, as well as Lough Leane, are considered the region’s most remarkable aspect. Fronting Killarney town is famous as the demesne of Ross Castle. The walls look out over the beautiful lake, which is dotted with several islands as well as being surrounded by woods that run miles of paths through. Killarney is one great place to watch a couple of the Gaelic sports, with one hurling team as well as the Gaelic football squads.

Lismore

Lismore Abbey used to be among the most important ecclesiastical centers of Ireland for study and education. Though the abbey was not long-lived, soon to get replaced by Lismore Castle, the scholastic significance remained. The Book of Lismore was, around the 15th century, compiled of a variety of writings inclusive of folios on Irish saints. More recently, writers like William M. Thackeray staying at Lismore House Hotel as well as travel writer Dervla Murphy from Lismore, continue the literary tradition of the town.

Kinsale

Buildings in a lot of Irish towns are daubed in the paints full of colors, yet none as pleasantly as Kinsale sited to the south of Cork. The town was once one prominent Royal Navy port; also, storehouses were developed in the town. The James O’Neill building – one of them, can still be seen. Yet the history here is rooted in rebellion instead of subservience. The Spanish Armada landed here and united with Irish rebels, but was put down. Now in ruins, James Fort was built in the wake of that battle. The old town center’s narrow streets are great for one after-dinner stroll. 

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 5)

Dungarvan

It is one harbor town midway along the southern coast of Ireland, Dungarvan has worked to retain plenty of its traditional charm. This town is indeed divided into two by the estuary of Colligan River, with the town’s main sights found on the river’s west side. These have the Waterford County Museum as well as, as with a lot of Irish towns, the castle. Dungarvan Castle is known for overlooking the harbor, which is primarily populated by small fishing and sailing boats nowadays. Plus, there is an old Augustinian friary’s remnant, around which has been sited one more modern Catholic Church.

Kilkenny

South Park fans can be forgiven as they think this comes with a different meaning; still, Kilkenny is among the most popular tourist destinations of Ireland. Easily accessible on a day journey from Dublin, the medieval town features many ancient buildings with excellent preservation. For example, Kilkenny Castle is situated on the Nore River’s banks and with ample grounds. There are other notable buildings, say, Rothe House – it is the house of one 16th century merchant, and St. Canice’s Cathedral. This place is more than only one historic honeypot, though; in the Kilkenny Arts Festival, Irish and international creativity is displayed over ten days each August.

Kenmare

Located at Kenmare Bay’s head, which opens out into the Atlantic Ocean, this town is charming. It first gained some semblance of worldly prominence through the lace-working industry. Here, the distinction in needlepoint lace technique was started by Saint Clare’s Convent’s nuns, although it has since closed. Yet, the Lace and Design Centre of Kenmare is open to the public. Not all, Kenmare has the Bronze Age stone circle close to the center of the town. The main center is quite small, but there are excellent hotels and restaurants here.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 4)

Dalkey

Plagues and Vikings are among the things that brought it a significant share of notoriety throughout the days gone by. Perhaps the plague entered the country through a ship that docked at the port – it was first made by Viking invaders from the 8th century. Today, the names connected with the town, sited just to Dublin’s south, include the likes of Enya, Van Morrison, and Bono. The town is regarded as the Irish capital city’s affluent satellite. Yet with castles, bars, and restaurants of its own, it savors the pleasant historical town’s atmosphere.

Dingle

The Dingle Peninsula’s key town is a fishing harbor located at the rugged Conor Pass’s one end that winds over the land’s mountainous finger, providing some of the most captivating views in Ireland. The area is famous for the Irish culture. The pubs are considered the cultural action’s center, at least in which music is concerned. At the same time, the area’s sea life is another popular attraction with bottlenose dolphins often spotted in the bay as well as an aquarium in town that lets visitors have a better idea of the world below the waves.

Donegal

As County Donegal’s namesake, sport and culture find their hub at the regional level in Donegal Town. Many smaller amateur clubs intended for sports are present such as Gaelic football and hurling, yet even at the amateur level, the Gaelic sports display a terrific level of power and physical prowess. The early history of the town predates written records – it is, rather, written in the formations of a stone circle which are common in the country’s part. Donegal Castle is located in the town center as well as being near the centerpiece, which many of the pubs and hotels can be found. It is a fantastic base for hikers, too.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 3)

Carlingford

Why do not you stand on Carlingford’s shore as well as looking across the lough? That way, you will be able to admire Northern Ireland. Plenty of history connected to the Irish Sea’s other side can probably be found in Carlingford’s medieval streets. A toll gate and mint tend to be overshadowed by the remarkable King John Castle which was built by the Normans around 1210 after these ones first invaded Ireland from 1173. The strategic location of the town has ever been the source of success. Yet divisions aside, this town is full of historic remnants and travelers can find some great seafood here as well.

Cobh


It is a significant seaport for many transatlantic ships. It was also Europe’s last stopping point before the Titanic started its fateful maiden voyage. This town is quirky and quaint. You will see cottages that are cutely painted step down to the fantastic waterfront beside St. Colman’s Cathedral’s prominent spire. A memorial is present by the edge of the water to the Lusitania – it is another impressive ship that succumbed to the deeps when getting sunk by a U-boat of the  German close by. Cobh was one of the crucial ports in several most significant mass migrations in the 19th century. Be sure you consider visiting this place.

Clifden

County Galway is famous as one of the most beautiful Irish counties, and the verdant, wooded surrounds of Clifden do nothing to minimize that claim. Beginning life quite late, earlier in the 19th century, it came into being as a result of Clifden Castle close by. This town was linked by the road to Galway as well as beyond. The estate did fail and fall into disrepair, but this great town continued modest growth and is considered Connemara’s unofficial capital these days.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 2)

Aughrim

The country has several towns by Aughrim’s name, but it is this scenic place in County Wicklow which makes this list. Positioned by the Derry & Ow rivers’ confluence, the original raison of the town d’être was the surrounding granite mine. That is why the forge, terraced houses, and town hall are built of granite as well as having a unique architectural style. Many hikers are attracted to the town since it is a fantastic starting point for the relaxing Sean Linehan Walk, a route of 6km that begin at Tinakilly Bridge.

Birr

Interior of Ireland is often overlooked. Either, it is bypassed for larger cities and towns. Yet, Birr makes an extraordinary claim for taking a break in the place. Famous as a heritage town, the jaunty character is offered by the preserved Georgian buildings. A lot of them are painted different colors. As one of the numerous sites of interest in the town, this Birr Castle is considered the most intriguing. A telescope made here and displayed to the public was the world’s largest for over 50 years until 1917. Plus, it was instrumental in various vital advances in astronomy’s science.

Bruff

Maybe the most wayward claim for the fame of Bruff from County Limerick is the John F. In case you do not know, Kennedy is the Bruff’s Fitzgeralds’ descendant. He indeed visited the small town from 1963. Also, Bruff is famous for its sporting heritage compared to its tourist sights. Sport has got a passive attraction owing to several excellent murals that are painted around town. Just to Bruff’s north, Lough Gur is known as a beautiful lake with a significant amount of wildlife. There is also a heritage centre as well as the ancient stone circle. Do not hesitate to plan for the trip there.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 1)

By travel and Ireland, plenty of folks may consider the classics of Dublin or Cork, on the one hand. It possibly evokes Galway’s romantic idyll through Galway Bay’s verse, as Liam Clancy sang, for discerning individuals. On the other hand, for a real fan of this country’s culture, smaller towns are likely to come to their mind, with passionate communities and pleasant cottages.

So, the question that arises is, what are Ireland’s best towns? In this post, you are going to discover the towns accumulating the most votes. We have considered all sizes of the towns for your reference.

Adare

Adare is likely to kick off the proceedings by the alphabet’s virtue, but it is worth this list. Its historic buildings and beautiful thatched cottages are among the things that make Adare one of the prettiest towns in Ireland. Also, there are many historical landmarks. You can discover Desmond Castle’s ramparts from the 12th century. Not all, Adare Manor is convertible into a golf resort and luxury hotel. The 15th century Franciscan Abbey’s ruins are next to the fantastic golf course. The Trinitarians – an alternative Catholic order, have their monastery in the town.

Ardara

Ardara is known as County Donegal’s unassuming coastal town. You can pronounce it as “Ardra”. This place is great for experiencing a more peaceful pace of life pace in the country. Its rural surrounds – for example, the moorland passes and the rugged coastline, may be what will bring you to this less-visited corner in Ireland. The pleasant town is an excellent base; you can travel to the Maghera Falls from it. Not all, from Loughros Point, you are likely to appreciate impressive views across the Atlantic Ocean. What is more, the Kilclooney Dolmen tombs are among the rare Celtic monuments for those who do not want to share it with other visitors.