European towns

10 most romantic towns in France (part 3)

  1. KAYSERSBERG, ALSACE

In 2017, in the Village préféré des Français, Kayersberg in the Alsace region of northeastern France was voted one of the loveliest towns in the country. Walt Disney also once selected this charming land as the setting for Beauty and the Beast, a famous animated film.

The idyllic rural scene with cute houses, ancient museums, clean and beautiful pedestrian streets, and diverse architecture of Kayersberg can steal your heart from the very first time. In addition, let’s try Alsace’s finest wines as well as kouglof and foie gras.

  1. ROUSSILLON, PROVENCE

Located between the Luberon hill and the Monts de Vaucluse mountains in the Provence region of France, Roussillon is famous for its vermilion red cliffs and many impressive brown gold quarries. Discovering this small town, visitors have the opportunity to admire the lovely houses in colorful colors.

Besides, the vine fields and lush fruit gardens as well as the fresh air and peaceful pace of this idyllic countryside will make us infatuated. Also, don’t forget to visit the lovely honey and herb stores hidden deep in every corner of the village. A wonderful vacation in Roussillon will help you recharge the journey ahead.

  1. SAINT-ÉMILION, BORDEAUX

Located in the middle of a rich valley, Saint-Émilion is surrounded by lush green vine fields full of life. With the typical structure of a medieval riverside town of Garonne, this town is famous for its many solid stone walls, solid ramparts and a series of winding routes.

On the rough stone eaves, ivy and micro-walls grow lush green and silently paint bright colors for this dreamland. In addition, the bumpy stone paved roads will take visitors to some mysterious wine cellars next to the craggy cliffs. In addition, you should also stop by famous places of Saint-Émilion such as Monolite Church, Roy Tower, etc.

  1. VILLEFRANCHE-SUR-MER, PROVENCE

Located on the beautiful Cote d’Azur beach, Villefranche-sur-Mer is a sparkling summer dream beside a peaceful fishing village. Not only possessing winding roads running along rows of bright pastel-colored houses, this town also embraces many extremely splendid villas.

Give yourself lazy afternoons to sip a warm cup of coffee while enjoying the cool sea breeze. Finally, before leaving Villefranche-sur-Mer, you must visit the Chapelle St-Pierre chapel. Built in the 14th century, this architectural work attracts tourists by many lively and mysterious frescoes.

European towns

Colmar: A Fairy Town of France

With colorful half-timbered houses running along the canal, Colmar is considered one of the most beautiful medieval towns in the world.

Nestled among the vine-foothills of the Vosges mountains, in the Alsace region, northeastern France, Colmar is one of Europe’s best-preserved medieval towns. Colmar is located about 70 km from Strasbourg and borders Germany. The town is also located on the main railway from Strasbourg to Besel, Switzerland.

It was founded in 884 by emperor Charles III (Charles The Fat), the Carolingian empire. Historically, Colmar was once owned by Sweden or Germany.

During World War II, the surrounding areas were bombed and ravaged, however Colmar remained intact. Until 1945, this place was officially a part of France. Despite its tumultuous history of wars and fires, the buildings of Colmar retain their ancient beauty to this day.

Colmar features half-timbered houses with shades of green, pink, mint and apricot gold. All are located neatly on the cobblestone streets leading to the peaceful canal. People often keep the streets organized and decorate the house like a work of art, with baskets of flowers, lights and old bicycles.

Wandering on the street, many visitors seem to be lost in fairy tales in childhood. British travel blogger Lucy wrote tall towers that could be where Rapunzel let her long hair flow through the window, while small houses were like dwarfs.

The first attraction is the Maison Adolph, the oldest architecture in the town, built around 1350. The house is influenced by Gothic architecture, with pointed arches, German style. The third floor and half-timbered walls in the roof were added in the 16th century.

The Pfister house was built in 1537 and the owner was the hunter Ludwig Scherer. A two-story corner house, a wood gallery, an octagonal turret, and murals that show biblical images. The name Pfister is named after a family who renovated the house and lived there from 1841 to 1892.

The “jewel” of the town is the Petit Venice district, dubbed the small Venice of France. The short, smooth channel flows through the neighborhood. The banks of the canal are planted with green trees and colorful flowers. Some buildings here date from the 14th century.

There is a boat tour, sightseeing on the canal. Each trip lasts 25 minutes and the boatman will explain and introduce the history and story of the town. The boat departs at the foot of the Saint-Pierre Bridge, cost 7 EUR per person, free for children under 10 years old.