European towns

10 most romantic towns in France (part 1)

France is not only famous for fashion, wine or perfume. The most romantic country in the world also makes us captivated by the peaceful countryside with fairy colors.

Not owning many modern shops, luxury restaurants or art museums, the 10 charming towns below have charming, rustic and original beauty. These are vivid examples of the impressive Renaissance architectural style as well as the everlasting cultural and historical flow and the French people’s dream of conquering new lands.

ANNECY, HAUTE-SAVOIE

E nestled on the green Lake Annecy, Annecy is like a jewel of the Alps. 300 km southeast of Paris, this peaceful town is famous for its lovely old houses, lush green canals all year round and pure, fresh plateau atmosphere.

Coming to Annecy, visitors can not ignore the Pont des Amours, where couples hand knitting stroll leisurely and exchange the most passionate kisses. In addition, if you are passionate about learning about culture and history, you must definitely visit the Château d’Annecy castle and museum! This place has many interesting surprises waiting for you to discover.

CARCASSONNE, LANGUEDOC

Located in a high hill of the Languedoc region in southwestern France, Carcassone is one of the typical medieval towns in the country of hexagon. From the majestic castles looking down, the majestic, spectacular landscape here will make you feel like you are becoming the hegemony of the world.

Carcassone used to be on the arterial axis of traffic between the ancient nations of France and Spain. Therefore, past wars have turned the town into a major military base with a series of fortified fortresses. Located on a windy high hill, the citadels built of gray stone are still intact to this day. Despite the harsh flow of time, these buildings still stand silhouetted against a deep blue sky.

CLUNY, BURGUNDY

The romantic town of Cluny is surrounded by Burgundy, a peaceful, quiet countryside with immense green hills. Not only possessing charming natural scenery, this place is also the cradle of many ancient monasteries. In contrast to the vibrant green of the vineyards, Cluny Monastery stands out by its solid stone wall and numerous sculptures imbued with religious breath.

Benedictine, the second largest monastery in the West of Christendom, is also the great pride of the people here. In addition, the ancient Abbot Jean de Bourbon palace will bring visitors unique cultural and historical experiences. If conditional, you should choose to stay at the hotel Château d’Igé. This magnificent building is tucked away in the famous wine region of Mâconnais, and is cuddled with shady old trees and beautiful rose gardens.

Blog, European towns, Tourism

5 Beautiful Small Town in Europe

1 / GIETHOORN (NETHERLANDS)
The village of Giethoorn in Northern Netherlands is often referred to by another name “The Venice of the North” (The Venice of the North) also by the peaceful canals of this small town. A land that appeared out of fairy tales with thatched roof houses interspersed next to each ruler and tree-lined walkways. We can even take a boat to weave through the corners of Giethoorn street.

2 / HALLSTÄTT (AUSTRIA)
There is something very special in the small town of Hallstätt as he wanders on a ferry across the lake which is like glass, amid a mist of fog rolling down from the Dachstein mountains. This is a town recognized by UNESCO as a World Cultural Heritage with the churches from the 12th century, a bustling market and plaza with many cozy restaurants. Hallstätt is only an hour from Salzburg and a three-hour drive from Vienna, this geographic advantage will create more opportunities for you to travel in Austria.

3 / TAORMINA (ITALY)
It is hard to find a less romantic town in Italy, but in Taormina there always exists something really special, a coastal town on the island of Sicily. The views from the high mountains of Mount Etna or the Ionian Sea will mesmerize your senses, and our feet will be held back by the ancient ruins and the roads filled with cafes. And reward yourself with an experience at the Belmond Grand Hotel Timeo, you will never want to leave your room.

4 / SOGLIO (SWITZERLAND)
“Gateway to heaven” – it’s a beautiful name that Italian artist Giovanni Segantini gave to the small town of Soglio in Switzerland. Nestled in the Bregaglia valley in the mountains close to the Italian border, the town of Soglio is like a peaceful harmony of heaven and earth. Come here to walk on the streets, breathe the fresh air and roses in the historic Palazzo Salis garden. Serenity is a better catalyst for human emotions.

5 / BLED (SLOVENIA)
Bled is a strange fairy village on Lake Bled. Everything here is covered with an ancient layer; From the 12th-century castle, located on a cliff overlooking the lake, to charming restaurants under candlelight at night. According to many reviews, this is a very romantic place for couples and ancient stories have told that: Visit the island’s church and ring a few bells, all dreams of You will come true.

European towns

Colmar: A Fairy Town of France

With colorful half-timbered houses running along the canal, Colmar is considered one of the most beautiful medieval towns in the world.

Nestled among the vine-foothills of the Vosges mountains, in the Alsace region, northeastern France, Colmar is one of Europe’s best-preserved medieval towns. Colmar is located about 70 km from Strasbourg and borders Germany. The town is also located on the main railway from Strasbourg to Besel, Switzerland.

It was founded in 884 by emperor Charles III (Charles The Fat), the Carolingian empire. Historically, Colmar was once owned by Sweden or Germany.

During World War II, the surrounding areas were bombed and ravaged, however Colmar remained intact. Until 1945, this place was officially a part of France. Despite its tumultuous history of wars and fires, the buildings of Colmar retain their ancient beauty to this day.

Colmar features half-timbered houses with shades of green, pink, mint and apricot gold. All are located neatly on the cobblestone streets leading to the peaceful canal. People often keep the streets organized and decorate the house like a work of art, with baskets of flowers, lights and old bicycles.

Wandering on the street, many visitors seem to be lost in fairy tales in childhood. British travel blogger Lucy wrote tall towers that could be where Rapunzel let her long hair flow through the window, while small houses were like dwarfs.

The first attraction is the Maison Adolph, the oldest architecture in the town, built around 1350. The house is influenced by Gothic architecture, with pointed arches, German style. The third floor and half-timbered walls in the roof were added in the 16th century.

The Pfister house was built in 1537 and the owner was the hunter Ludwig Scherer. A two-story corner house, a wood gallery, an octagonal turret, and murals that show biblical images. The name Pfister is named after a family who renovated the house and lived there from 1841 to 1892.

The “jewel” of the town is the Petit Venice district, dubbed the small Venice of France. The short, smooth channel flows through the neighborhood. The banks of the canal are planted with green trees and colorful flowers. Some buildings here date from the 14th century.

There is a boat tour, sightseeing on the canal. Each trip lasts 25 minutes and the boatman will explain and introduce the history and story of the town. The boat departs at the foot of the Saint-Pierre Bridge, cost 7 EUR per person, free for children under 10 years old.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 7)

Malahide

Only over 35 minutes north of Dublin is one charming fishing town in Ireland. Malahide has, similar to so many Irish towns, one castle as well as demesne that are regarded as being enough of a draw to this region. Yet, it is the big marina that is the most endearing feature of Malahide. The town has one small beach, and over the estuary here are no fewer than various golf clubs. There is also one pleasant coastal walk from Malahide to Portmarnock. Although a lot of people see Malahide as one good day trip from Dublin, several hotels in town are available for those who prefer to be away from the hustle of the big city.

Westport

Defining features of Westport are the malls that are the Carrowbeg River’s either side – the river runs through the heart of town. Here, the Georgian buildings, as well as design, were the work of famous British architect James Wyatt that is known for the designs of many buildings, including Woolwich’s Royal Military Academy. The town is regarded as being among the best in Ireland, not only in terms of its charm but also its quality of life quality. In Westport, one of the primary draws is the surrounding scenery, which has Croagh Patrick, one mountain to which a lot of people make a pilgrimage yearly for the summer solstice.

Oughterard

It is located in County Galway. Loughs, as well as hills, surround it. Oughterard is famous as one angling center, with Lough Corrib, known as the Republic of Ireland’s largest lake, being an excellent fish source. The town itself is often considered an excellent location to stay when looking to discover the surrounding countryside. There are some castles here; Aughnanure is one impressive structure that dates back to the 16th century. 

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 6)

Killarney

It is easily among the prettiest as well as the most charming places in Ireland. It is one characterful attraction with its longstanding importance as one religious site from the seventh century. Yet, Killarney National Park, as well as Lough Leane, are considered the region’s most remarkable aspect. Fronting Killarney town is famous as the demesne of Ross Castle. The walls look out over the beautiful lake, which is dotted with several islands as well as being surrounded by woods that run miles of paths through. Killarney is one great place to watch a couple of the Gaelic sports, with one hurling team as well as the Gaelic football squads.

Lismore

Lismore Abbey used to be among the most important ecclesiastical centers of Ireland for study and education. Though the abbey was not long-lived, soon to get replaced by Lismore Castle, the scholastic significance remained. The Book of Lismore was, around the 15th century, compiled of a variety of writings inclusive of folios on Irish saints. More recently, writers like William M. Thackeray staying at Lismore House Hotel as well as travel writer Dervla Murphy from Lismore, continue the literary tradition of the town.

Kinsale

Buildings in a lot of Irish towns are daubed in the paints full of colors, yet none as pleasantly as Kinsale sited to the south of Cork. The town was once one prominent Royal Navy port; also, storehouses were developed in the town. The James O’Neill building – one of them, can still be seen. Yet the history here is rooted in rebellion instead of subservience. The Spanish Armada landed here and united with Irish rebels, but was put down. Now in ruins, James Fort was built in the wake of that battle. The old town center’s narrow streets are great for one after-dinner stroll. 

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 5)

Dungarvan

It is one harbor town midway along the southern coast of Ireland, Dungarvan has worked to retain plenty of its traditional charm. This town is indeed divided into two by the estuary of Colligan River, with the town’s main sights found on the river’s west side. These have the Waterford County Museum as well as, as with a lot of Irish towns, the castle. Dungarvan Castle is known for overlooking the harbor, which is primarily populated by small fishing and sailing boats nowadays. Plus, there is an old Augustinian friary’s remnant, around which has been sited one more modern Catholic Church.

Kilkenny

South Park fans can be forgiven as they think this comes with a different meaning; still, Kilkenny is among the most popular tourist destinations of Ireland. Easily accessible on a day journey from Dublin, the medieval town features many ancient buildings with excellent preservation. For example, Kilkenny Castle is situated on the Nore River’s banks and with ample grounds. There are other notable buildings, say, Rothe House – it is the house of one 16th century merchant, and St. Canice’s Cathedral. This place is more than only one historic honeypot, though; in the Kilkenny Arts Festival, Irish and international creativity is displayed over ten days each August.

Kenmare

Located at Kenmare Bay’s head, which opens out into the Atlantic Ocean, this town is charming. It first gained some semblance of worldly prominence through the lace-working industry. Here, the distinction in needlepoint lace technique was started by Saint Clare’s Convent’s nuns, although it has since closed. Yet, the Lace and Design Centre of Kenmare is open to the public. Not all, Kenmare has the Bronze Age stone circle close to the center of the town. The main center is quite small, but there are excellent hotels and restaurants here.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 4)

Dalkey

Plagues and Vikings are among the things that brought it a significant share of notoriety throughout the days gone by. Perhaps the plague entered the country through a ship that docked at the port – it was first made by Viking invaders from the 8th century. Today, the names connected with the town, sited just to Dublin’s south, include the likes of Enya, Van Morrison, and Bono. The town is regarded as the Irish capital city’s affluent satellite. Yet with castles, bars, and restaurants of its own, it savors the pleasant historical town’s atmosphere.

Dingle

The Dingle Peninsula’s key town is a fishing harbor located at the rugged Conor Pass’s one end that winds over the land’s mountainous finger, providing some of the most captivating views in Ireland. The area is famous for the Irish culture. The pubs are considered the cultural action’s center, at least in which music is concerned. At the same time, the area’s sea life is another popular attraction with bottlenose dolphins often spotted in the bay as well as an aquarium in town that lets visitors have a better idea of the world below the waves.

Donegal

As County Donegal’s namesake, sport and culture find their hub at the regional level in Donegal Town. Many smaller amateur clubs intended for sports are present such as Gaelic football and hurling, yet even at the amateur level, the Gaelic sports display a terrific level of power and physical prowess. The early history of the town predates written records – it is, rather, written in the formations of a stone circle which are common in the country’s part. Donegal Castle is located in the town center as well as being near the centerpiece, which many of the pubs and hotels can be found. It is a fantastic base for hikers, too.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 3)

Carlingford

Why do not you stand on Carlingford’s shore as well as looking across the lough? That way, you will be able to admire Northern Ireland. Plenty of history connected to the Irish Sea’s other side can probably be found in Carlingford’s medieval streets. A toll gate and mint tend to be overshadowed by the remarkable King John Castle which was built by the Normans around 1210 after these ones first invaded Ireland from 1173. The strategic location of the town has ever been the source of success. Yet divisions aside, this town is full of historic remnants and travelers can find some great seafood here as well.

Cobh


It is a significant seaport for many transatlantic ships. It was also Europe’s last stopping point before the Titanic started its fateful maiden voyage. This town is quirky and quaint. You will see cottages that are cutely painted step down to the fantastic waterfront beside St. Colman’s Cathedral’s prominent spire. A memorial is present by the edge of the water to the Lusitania – it is another impressive ship that succumbed to the deeps when getting sunk by a U-boat of the  German close by. Cobh was one of the crucial ports in several most significant mass migrations in the 19th century. Be sure you consider visiting this place.

Clifden

County Galway is famous as one of the most beautiful Irish counties, and the verdant, wooded surrounds of Clifden do nothing to minimize that claim. Beginning life quite late, earlier in the 19th century, it came into being as a result of Clifden Castle close by. This town was linked by the road to Galway as well as beyond. The estate did fail and fall into disrepair, but this great town continued modest growth and is considered Connemara’s unofficial capital these days.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 2)

Aughrim

The country has several towns by Aughrim’s name, but it is this scenic place in County Wicklow which makes this list. Positioned by the Derry & Ow rivers’ confluence, the original raison of the town d’être was the surrounding granite mine. That is why the forge, terraced houses, and town hall are built of granite as well as having a unique architectural style. Many hikers are attracted to the town since it is a fantastic starting point for the relaxing Sean Linehan Walk, a route of 6km that begin at Tinakilly Bridge.

Birr

Interior of Ireland is often overlooked. Either, it is bypassed for larger cities and towns. Yet, Birr makes an extraordinary claim for taking a break in the place. Famous as a heritage town, the jaunty character is offered by the preserved Georgian buildings. A lot of them are painted different colors. As one of the numerous sites of interest in the town, this Birr Castle is considered the most intriguing. A telescope made here and displayed to the public was the world’s largest for over 50 years until 1917. Plus, it was instrumental in various vital advances in astronomy’s science.

Bruff

Maybe the most wayward claim for the fame of Bruff from County Limerick is the John F. In case you do not know, Kennedy is the Bruff’s Fitzgeralds’ descendant. He indeed visited the small town from 1963. Also, Bruff is famous for its sporting heritage compared to its tourist sights. Sport has got a passive attraction owing to several excellent murals that are painted around town. Just to Bruff’s north, Lough Gur is known as a beautiful lake with a significant amount of wildlife. There is also a heritage centre as well as the ancient stone circle. Do not hesitate to plan for the trip there.

European towns

Which are the most mesmerizing towns of Ireland? (Part 1)

By travel and Ireland, plenty of folks may consider the classics of Dublin or Cork, on the one hand. It possibly evokes Galway’s romantic idyll through Galway Bay’s verse, as Liam Clancy sang, for discerning individuals. On the other hand, for a real fan of this country’s culture, smaller towns are likely to come to their mind, with passionate communities and pleasant cottages.

So, the question that arises is, what are Ireland’s best towns? In this post, you are going to discover the towns accumulating the most votes. We have considered all sizes of the towns for your reference.

Adare

Adare is likely to kick off the proceedings by the alphabet’s virtue, but it is worth this list. Its historic buildings and beautiful thatched cottages are among the things that make Adare one of the prettiest towns in Ireland. Also, there are many historical landmarks. You can discover Desmond Castle’s ramparts from the 12th century. Not all, Adare Manor is convertible into a golf resort and luxury hotel. The 15th century Franciscan Abbey’s ruins are next to the fantastic golf course. The Trinitarians – an alternative Catholic order, have their monastery in the town.

Ardara

Ardara is known as County Donegal’s unassuming coastal town. You can pronounce it as “Ardra”. This place is great for experiencing a more peaceful pace of life pace in the country. Its rural surrounds – for example, the moorland passes and the rugged coastline, may be what will bring you to this less-visited corner in Ireland. The pleasant town is an excellent base; you can travel to the Maghera Falls from it. Not all, from Loughros Point, you are likely to appreciate impressive views across the Atlantic Ocean. What is more, the Kilclooney Dolmen tombs are among the rare Celtic monuments for those who do not want to share it with other visitors.